Municipalities of Sonora

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Map of Mexico with Sonora highlighted
Map of Mexico with Sonora highlighted

Sonora is a state in Northwestern Mexico that is divided into 72 municipalities. According to the 2020 Mexican Census, it is the eighteenth most populated state with 2,944,840 inhabitants and the 2nd largest by land area spanning 179,354.7 square kilometres (69,249.2 sq mi).[1][2]

Municipalities in Sonora are administratively autonomous of the state according to the 115th article of the 1917 Constitution of Mexico.[3] Every three years, citizens elect a municipal president (Spanish: presidente municipal) by a plurality voting system who heads a concurrently elected municipal council (ayuntamiento) responsible for providing all the public services for their constituents. The municipal council consists of a variable number of trustees and councillors (regidores y síndicos).[4] Municipalities are responsible for public services (such as water and sewerage), street lighting, public safety, traffic, and the maintenance of public parks, gardens and cemeteries.[5] They may also assist the state and federal governments in education, emergency fire and medical services, environmental protection and maintenance of monuments and historical landmarks. Since 1984, they have had the power to collect property taxes and user fees, although more funds are obtained from the state and federal governments than from their own income.[5]

The largest municipality by population is Hermosillo, with 936,263 residents (31.79% of the state's total), while the smallest is Onavas with 365 residents.[1] The largest municipality by land area is also Hermosillo which spans 15,724.30 km2 (6,071.19 sq mi), and the smallest is San Felipe de Jesús with 151.30 km2 (58.42 sq mi).[2] The newest municipalities are Benito Juárez and San Ignacio Río Muerto, established in 1996.[6]

Municipalities[edit]

State capital  State capital

Name Municipal seat Population
(2020)[1]
Population
(2010)[7]
Change Land area[2] Population density
(2020)
Incorporation date[6]
km2 sq mi
Aconchi[a] Aconchi 2,563 2,637 −2.8% 368.2 142.2 7.0/km2 (18.0/sq mi) December 26, 1829
Agua Prieta Agua Prieta 91,929 79,138 +16.2% 3,946.5 1,523.8 23.3/km2 (60.3/sq mi) August 28, 1916
Álamos Álamos 24,976 25,848 −3.4% 6,422.8 2,479.9 3.9/km2 (10.1/sq mi) January 19, 1825
Altar[b] Altar 9,492 9,049 +4.9% 4,457.7 1,721.1 2.1/km2 (5.5/sq mi) November 2, 1825
Arivechi Arivechi 1,177 1,253 −6.1% 726.3 280.4 1.6/km2 (4.2/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Arizpe Arizpe 2,788 3,037 −8.2% 3,072.0 1,186.1 0.9/km2 (2.4/sq mi) November 2, 1825
Atil Atil 626 625 +0.2% 300.4 116.0 2.1/km2 (5.4/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Bacadéhuachi[c] Bacadéhuachi 979 1,252 −21.8% 1,066.0 411.6 0.9/km2 (2.4/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Bacanora[d] Bacanora 759 784 −3.2% 1,128.9 435.9 0.7/km2 (1.7/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Bacerac Bacerac 1,221 1,467 −16.8% 1,344.6 519.2 0.9/km2 (2.4/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Bacoachi Bacoachi 1,475 1,646 −10.4% 1,231.0 475.3 1.2/km2 (3.1/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Bácum[e] Bácum 23,151 22,821 +1.4% 1,583.3 611.3 14.6/km2 (37.9/sq mi) August 31, 1911
Banámichi[f] Banámichi 1,825 1,646 +10.9% 808.1 312.0 2.3/km2 (5.8/sq mi) December 26, 1829
Baviácora[g] Baviácora 3,191 3,560 −10.4% 842.5 325.3 3.8/km2 (9.8/sq mi) December 26, 1829
Bavispe[h] Bavispe 1,169 1,454 −19.6% 1,721.7 664.8 0.7/km2 (1.8/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Benito Juárez Villa Juárez 21,692 22,009 −1.4% 369.5 142.7 58.7/km2 (152.0/sq mi) December 26, 1996
Benjamín Hill Benjamín Hill 4,988 5,275 −5.4% 1,412.2 545.3 3.5/km2 (9.1/sq mi) April 19, 1952
Caborca Caborca 89,122 81,309 +9.6% 10,671.7 4,120.4 8.4/km2 (21.6/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Cajeme Ciudad Obregón 436,484 409,310 +6.6% 4,876.3 1,882.7 89.5/km2 (231.8/sq mi) November 30, 1927
Cananea Cananea 39,451 32,936 +19.8% 2,316.2 894.3 17.0/km2 (44.1/sq mi) November 1, 1907
Carbó[i] Carbó 4,946 5,347 −7.5% 2,581.8 996.8 1.9/km2 (5.0/sq mi) July 3, 1943
Cucurpe[j] Cucurpe 863 958 −9.9% 1,577.9 609.2 0.5/km2 (1.4/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Cumpas Cumpas 5,829 6,362 −8.4% 2,010.0 776.1 2.9/km2 (7.5/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Divisaderos Divisaderos 753 813 −7.4% 385.7 148.9 2.0/km2 (5.1/sq mi) April 23, 1932
Empalme[k] Empalme 51,431 54,131 −5.0% 593.2 229.0 86.7/km2 (224.6/sq mi) May 8, 1937
Etchojoa Etchojoa 61,309 60,717 +1.0% 948.6 366.3 64.6/km2 (167.4/sq mi) October 15, 1909
Fronteras[l] Fronteras 9,041 8,639 +4.7% 2,616.4 1,010.2 3.5/km2 (8.9/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Granados[m] Granados 1,009 1,150 −12.3% 363.9 140.5 2.8/km2 (7.2/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Guaymas[n] Guaymas 156,863 149,299 +5.1% 7,945.6 3,067.8 19.7/km2 (51.1/sq mi) February 28, 1845
Hermosillo[o] HermosilloState capital 936,263 784,342 +19.4% 15,724.3 6,071.2 59.5/km2 (154.2/sq mi) February 28, 1845
Huachinera[p] Huachinera 1,186 1,350 −12.1% 1,197.6 462.4 1.0/km2 (2.6/sq mi) December 15, 1921
Huásabas[q] Huásabas 888 962 −7.7% 821.7 317.3 1.1/km2 (2.8/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Huatabampo Huatabampo 77,682 79,313 −2.1% 1,905.5 735.7 40.8/km2 (105.6/sq mi) December 12, 1898
Huépac[r] Huépac 943 1,154 −18.3% 420.8 162.5 2.2/km2 (5.8/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Imuris[s] Imuris 12,536 12,316 +1.8% 2,170.0 837.8 5.8/km2 (15.0/sq mi) December 3, 1862
La Colorada[t] La Colorada 1,848 1,663 +11.1% 4,122.1 1,591.6 0.4/km2 (1.2/sq mi) June 26, 1889
Magdalena Magdalena de Kino 33,049 29,707 +11.2% 1,239.4 478.5 26.7/km2 (69.1/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Mazatán [u] Mazatán 1,101 1,350 −18.4% 683.0 263.7 1.6/km2 (4.2/sq mi) December 16, 1907
Moctezuma[v] Moctezuma 5,173 4,680 +10.5% 1,877.5 724.9 2.8/km2 (7.1/sq mi) November 2, 1825
Naco Naco 5,774 6,401 −9.8% 1,238.4 478.1 4.7/km2 (12.1/sq mi) June 30, 1937
Nácori Chico[w] Nácori Chico 1,531 2,051 −25.4% 2,832.7 1,093.7 0.5/km2 (1.4/sq mi) February 21, 1917
Nacozari Nacozari de García 14,369 12,751 +12.7% 1,735.8 670.2 8.3/km2 (21.4/sq mi) October 15, 1912
Navojoa Navojoa 164,387 157,729 +4.2% 2,808.7 1,084.4 58.5/km2 (151.6/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Nogales Nogales 264,782 220,292 +20.2% 1,756.6 678.2 150.7/km2 (390.4/sq mi) July 11, 1884
Onavas[x] Onavas 365 399 −8.5% 534.2 206.3 0.7/km2 (1.8/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Opodepe[y] Opodepe 2,438 2,878 −15.3% 2,224.3 858.8 1.1/km2 (2.8/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Oquitoa[z] Oquitoa 496 443 +12.0% 916.4 353.8 0.5/km2 (1.4/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Pitiquito Pitiquito 9,122 9,468 −3.7% 9,820.0 3,791.5 0.9/km2 (2.4/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Puerto Peñasco Puerto Peñasco 62,689 57,342 +9.3% 6,193.3 2,391.2 10.1/km2 (26.2/sq mi) July 7, 1952
Plutarco Elías Calles Sonoyta 13,627 15,625 −12.8% 3,656.7 1,411.9 3.7/km2 (9.7/sq mi) August 21, 1989
Quiriego[aa] Quiriego 3,090 3,356 −7.9% 3,780.6 1,459.7 0.8/km2 (2.1/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Rayón[ab] Rayón 1,496 1,599 −6.4% 879.1 339.4 1.7/km2 (4.4/sq mi) February 17, 1828
Rosario Rosario de Tesopaco 4,830 5,226 −7.6% 3,519.8 1,359.0 1.4/km2 (3.6/sq mi) November 2, 1825
Sahuaripa[ac] Sahuaripa 5,257 6,020 −12.7% 5,003.8 1,932.0 1.1/km2 (2.7/sq mi) November 2, 1825
San Felipe de Jesús[ad] San Felipe de Jesús 369 396 −6.8% 151.3 58.4 2.4/km2 (6.3/sq mi) December 3, 1862
San Ignacio Río Muerto San Ignacio Río Muerto 14,279 14,136 +1.0% 1,383.6 534.2 10.3/km2 (26.7/sq mi) December 26, 1996
San Javier[ae] San Javier 537 492 +9.1% 535.9 206.9 1.0/km2 (2.6/sq mi) December 3, 1862
San Luis Río Colorado San Luis Río Colorado 199,021 178,380 +11.6% 8,860.0 3,420.9 22.5/km2 (58.2/sq mi) July 1, 1939
San Miguel de Horcasitas [af] San Miguel de Horcasitas 10,729 8,382 +28.0% 1,115.6 430.7 9.6/km2 (24.9/sq mi) March 20, 1837
San Pedro de la Cueva[ag] San Pedro de la Cueva 1,458 1,604 −9.1% 2,229.5 860.8 0.7/km2 (1.7/sq mi) May 14, 1864
Santa Ana Santa Ana 16,203 16,014 +1.2% 1,476.6 570.1 11.0/km2 (28.4/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Santa Cruz[ah] Santa Cruz 1,835 1,998 −8.2% 1,001.2 386.6 1.8/km2 (4.7/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Sáric[ai] Sáric 2,058 2,703 −23.9% 1,353.6 522.6 1.5/km2 (3.9/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Soyopa[aj] Soyopa 1,368 1,284 +6.5% 1,716.8 662.9 0.8/km2 (2.1/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Suaqui Grande[ak] Suaqui Grande 1,114 1,121 −0.6% 914.8 353.2 1.2/km2 (3.2/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Tepache[al] Tepache 1,178 1,365 −13.7% 778.7 300.7 1.5/km2 (3.9/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Trincheras[am] Trincheras 1,381 1,731 −20.2% 3,010.4 1,162.3 0.5/km2 (1.2/sq mi) April 28, 1916
Tubutama[an] Tubutama 1,473 1,735 −15.1% 1,725.4 666.2 0.9/km2 (2.2/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Ures Ures 8,548 9,185 −6.9% 3,088.1 1,192.3 2.8/km2 (7.2/sq mi) May 13, 1848
Villa Hidalgo[ao] Villa Hidalgo 1,429 1,738 −17.8% 1,471.5 568.1 1.0/km2 (2.5/sq mi) December 11, 1874
Villa Pesqueira[ap] Villa Pesqueira 1,043 1,254 −16.8% 1,123.2 433.7 0.9/km2 (2.4/sq mi) May 6, 1852
Yécora[aq] Yécora 4,793 6,046 −20.7% 2,667.7 1,030.0 1.8/km2 (4.7/sq mi) December 3, 1862
Sonora 2,944,840 2,662,480 +10.6% 179,354.7 69,249.2 16.4/km2 (42.5/sq mi)
Mexico 126,014,024 112,336,538 +12.2% 1,960,646.7 757,010 64.3/km2 (166.5/sq mi)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Aconchi was merged with Arizpe between 1837-1862 and 1930-1932.[6]
  2. ^ Altar was renamed Villa Figueroa from 1828 to 1837.[6]
  3. ^ Bacadéhuachi was merged with Bacerac in 1930-31.[6]
  4. ^ Bacanora was merged with Sahuaripa in 1930-32.[6]
  5. ^ Bacum was merged with Cajeme in 1930-31.[6]
  6. ^ Banámichi was merged with Arizpe in 1930-31.[6]
  7. ^ Baviácora was merged with Arizpe in 1930-31.[6]
  8. ^ Bavispe was merged with Bacerac in 1930-31.[6]
  9. ^ Carbó was merged with San Miguel de Horcasitas in 1943-1953.[6]
  10. ^ Cucurpe was merged with Madgalena in 1930-32.[6]
  11. ^ Empalme was merged with Guaymas in 1940-1953.[6]
  12. ^ Fronteras was merged with Agua Prieta in 1930-31.[6]
  13. ^ Granados was merged with Cumpas in 1930-32.[6]
  14. ^ Guaymas was originally incorporated as Villa de Salvación, changing its name on May 13, 1848.[6]
  15. ^ Hermosillo was originally incorporated as Pitic, changing its name on September 5, 1828.[6]
  16. ^ Huachinera was merged with Bacerac in 1930-1952.[6]
  17. ^ Huásabas was merged with Cumpas in 1930-32.[6]
  18. ^ Huépac was merged with Arizpe in 1930-31.[6]
  19. ^ Imuris was merged with Magdalena in 1930-31.[6]
  20. ^ La Colorada was originally incorporated as Mineral de las Prietas, changing its name on December 7, 1903. It was merged with Hermosillo in 1930-34.[6]
  21. ^ Mazatán was merged with Ures in 1930-34.[6]
  22. ^ Moctezuma was originally incorporated as Oposura, changing its name on September 9, 1828.[6]
  23. ^ Nácori Chico was merged with Bacerac in 1930-1934.[6]
  24. ^ Onavas was merged with Soyopa in 1903-1907 and with Ures in 1930-1935.[6]
  25. ^ Opodepe was merged with Rayón in 1930-1933.[6]
  26. ^ Oquitoa was merged with Altar in 1930-1934.[6]
  27. ^ Quiriego was merged with Rosario in 1930-1932.[6]
  28. ^ Rayón was originally incorporated as Nacameri, changing its name on April 8, 1850.[6]
  29. ^ Sahuaripa was originally incorporated as Ostimuri, changing its name on March 20, 1837.[6]
  30. ^ San Felipe de Jesús was merged with Arizpe in 1930-32.[6]
  31. ^ San Javier was merged with Hermosillo in 1930-34.[6]
  32. ^ San Miguel de Horcasitas was merged with Ures in 1930-34.[6]
  33. ^ San Pedro de la Cueva was merged with Batuc in 1930-32.[6]
  34. ^ Santa Cruz was merged with Nogales in 1930-31.[6]
  35. ^ Sáric was merged with Altar in 1930-34.[6]
  36. ^ Soyopa was merged with Ures in 1930-35.[6]
  37. ^ Suaqui Grande was merged with Hermosillo in 1930-35.[6]
  38. ^ Tepache was merged with Moctezuma in 1930-32.[6]
  39. ^ Trincheras was merged with Pitiquito in 1930-34.[6]
  40. ^ Tubutama was merged with Sáric in 1903-08 and with Altar in 1930-34.[6]
  41. ^ Villa Hidalgo was originally incorporated as Oputo, changing its name on April 15, 1967.[6]
  42. ^ Villa Pesqueira was originally incorporated as Mápate, changing its name on June 30, 1934. Merged with Ures in 1930-34.[6]
  43. ^ Yécora was merged with Ures in 1930-35.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Censo de Población y Vivienda 2020 - SCITEL" (in Spanish). INEGI. Retrieved 2021-01-27.
  2. ^ a b c "México en cifras - Medio Ambiente - Sonora" (in Spanish). INEGI. Retrieved February 12, 2021.
  3. ^ "Constitución Política de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos". Article 115, Act of 1917 (in Spanish). Retrieved September 27, 2017.
  4. ^ OECD (November 12, 2004). New Forms of Governance for Economic Development. OECD Publishing. p. 121. ISBN 9264015329.
  5. ^ a b International Business Publications (2009). Mexico Company Laws and Regulations Handbook. p. 42. ISBN 978-1-4330-7030-3.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as Estado de Sonora División Territorial de 1810 a 1995 (PDF) (in Spanish). Mexico: INEGI. 1996. ISBN 970-13-1513-8.
  7. ^ "Censo de Población y Vivienda 2010 - SCITEL" (in Spanish). INEGI. Retrieved 2021-01-27.